Monday, July 1, 2019 to Monday, December 30, 2019

Erin King is a multidisciplinary artist working primarily in fiber-based processes, drawing inspiration from the universal tenet within fibers - the basis for the Aristotelian concepts of holism, synergy, and gestalt – of smaller elements working together to create something stronger, and the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. King is driven by social responsibility in all aspects of her art practice, and believes in the arts' ability to build as well as model community. King's most recent body of work involves creating and displaying tapestry weavings on experimental looms made of parts from "piano dead bodies", as well as using her visual artworks for music composition. King will receive her Masters of Fine Arts in Studio Art with an Emphasis in Fibers in May 2019. King received her Bachelors of Art in Studio Art (emphasis in painting) as well as Advertising & Marketing Communications from Webster University - St. Louis in 2012.

Artist Statement

In all aspects of my work, I am driven by social responsibility of the individual, and demonstrating the strength and interconnectedness of community. I use the binary systems, processes, technologies, and languages of Western music notation and weaving to present the limitations and biases of human perception, experience, and what society considers truth. Through the levels of translation between various digital and analog technologies, I bring to the foreground how far a thing is removed from its original state with each level of translation, highlighting the fallibility of technologies as well as the beauty that arises from imperfection. Borrowing from Wagner’s concept of the gesamtkunstwerk - the total work of art, or universal artwork - I consider each element within the work to be of equal importance and not merely a supplement to the visual.

I am a multidisciplinary artist working primarily in fiber-based processes. I am drawn to fiber art processes because of the universal tenet within fibers - the basis for the Aristotelian concepts of holism, synergy, and gestalt - of smaller elements working together to create something stronger, and the whole being greater than the sum of its parts. I am drawn to the historical tradition of reuse and repurposing materials within fiber-based traditions, and appreciate being as involved in the process of gathering and processing my art materials as I am in the process of creating the work itself. These motivating elements form a philosophical framework for my studio practice.

As my work evolves, one constant that remains is my use of the found object. In the Surrealist tradition, the found object was an object of unconscious desire that the artist stumbled upon. The found objects that I work with must be something that can no longer fulfill its primary function, and might otherwise be discarded. In this way, I see the found object as a metaphorical stand-in for societal outcasts. In claiming these objects, I apply value and see a new purpose for them. Oftentimes, I must deconstruct the object to use it as an art material or tool. In Musica Universalis , this found object is the piano; specifically piano “dead bodies” that would otherwise be in the landfill. Through the act of deconstruction and repurposing, the object is transformed.